Eagle Scout Page

The Eagle Scout Award. It’s Scouting’s highest rank and among its most familiar icons. Men who have earned it count it among their most treasured possessions. Those who missed it by a whisker remember exactly which requirement they didn’t complete. Americans from all walks of life know that being an Eagle Scout is a great honor, even if they don’t know just what the badge means.

The award is more than a badge. It’s a state of being. You are an Eagle Scout—never were. You may have received the badge as a boy, but you earn it every day as a man. In the words of the Eagle Scout Promise, you do your best each day to make your training and example, your rank and your influence count strongly for better Scouting and for better citizenship in your troop, in your community, and in your contacts with other people. And to this you pledge your sacred honor.
  • In 2010, 56,176 Scouts earned the rank of Eagle Scout.
  • Around 5 percent of all Boy Scouts earned the Eagle Scout rank in 2010.
  • In 2010, the average age of boys earning the Eagle Scout rank was 17 years of age.
  • From 1912 to 2010, more than 2 million Boy Scouts earned the Eagle Scout rank.

Eagle Scout Rank

To earn the rank, a Boy Scout must:
  • Progress through the ranks in the following order:
    • Tenderfoot
    • Second Class
    • First Class
    • Star
    • Life
    • Eagle
  • Earn 21 merit badges, including:
    • First Aid
    • Citizenship in the Community
    • Citizenship in the Nation
    • Citizenship in the World
    • Communications
    • Cooking
    • Environmental Science
    • Personal Fitness
    • Camping
    • Family Life
    • Personal Management
    • Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving
    • Cycling, Hiking, or Swimming
  • Serve six months in a troop leadership position.
  • Plan, develop, and give leadership to a service project for any religious organization or any school or community.
  • Take part in a Scoutmaster conference.
  • Successfully complete an Eagle Scout board of review.